Updating xml clob in oracle

Posted by / 03-Nov-2017 23:10

ABANDA-2007040105174348ABANDA-2007040205181412ABANDA-2007041106302127ABANDA-2007041405283313ABANDA-2007040105264865ABANDA-2007040400350593ABANDA-2007041402364776ABANDA-2007041704324786columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor', "User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' ) columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor',"User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order' passing xf.filecontent columns name varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/name', shipping_address varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/address', telephone varchar2(100) path 'Shipping Instructions/telephone' ) Shipping Instructions; as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order/Line Items/Line Item' passing xf.filecontent columns Item Number varchar2(100) path '@Item Number', Part_Description varchar2(100) path 'Part/@Description', Unit Price number path 'Part/@Unit Price', Quantity number path 'Quantity' ) Shipping Instructions; as "xsi"), 'Purchase Order' passing xf.filecontent columns Date Created varchar2(100) path '@Date Created', Reference varchar2(100) path 'Reference', Requestor varchar2(100) path 'Requestor', "User" varchar2(100) path 'User', Cost Center varchar2(100) path 'Cost Center', Special Instructions varchar2(100) path 'Special Instructions' ) Purchase Order; You can create indexes on your XML data, to focus on particular parts of it that you query often, and thus improve performance.XMLIndex provides a general, XML-specific index that indexes the internal structure of XML data.The restrictions in place made it impossible to edit the fields using utilities such as DBVIS or Toad for Oracle.I wanted to be able to write SQL Statements that allowed files to be read into the stream and update the backend database column (CLOB).Database, allows an XML document to be stored in a table.

The following PL/SQL block uses this constructor without the optional parameters to instantiate an XMLType object and insert it into the /* create directory to point to where XML docs are stored */ CREATE DIRECTORY xml_data AS 'c:\alan\OReilly\2nd_Edition'; DECLARE bfl BFILE; BEGIN /* attach XML document purch_to bfile locator */ bfl := BFILENAME('XML_DATA', 'purch_ord.xml'); /* add to purchase_order table */ INSERT INTO purchase_order (po_id, purchase_order_doc) VALUES (1000, XMLTYPE(bfl, nls_charset_id('WE8MSWIN1252'))); COMMIT; END; table now contains a record with the contents of the purch_file stored as a CLOB.

Oracle 11g’s XML preprocessors now includes a binary XML encoder, decoder and token manager.

Binary XMLType is optimized for storage and retrieval of XML data by reducing memory and CPU demand.

In my case, I copied the text (XML) from the source column in the source database and pasted it to a file.

The file handler is “EXAMPLE_LOB_DIR” and the directory is “/directory/to/filter.xml”. Update Column In Database Now that we have the file handler, we’ll use the chunk of SQL Syntax below, to read the XML File into a SQL UPDATE statement, which updates DATA(column) in the CONFIG(table) with data in the dest_clob(xml file).

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The DBMS_XMLDOM package is a bit more complicated as you’ll have to create the entire document by calling functions and procedures of the package.